Cooperate Social Responsibility

Responsible safari holidays
As the pioneers of responsible tourism, we’ve screened this (and every) holiday so that you can travel knowing it will help support the places and people that you visit, and the planet. Read how below.
Responsible safari holidays are designed to help you understand what you’re seeing, leave the landscape as you found it and, ideally, benefit both the wildlife and communities you come across while you travel. Read more about the issues facing Africa, and how choosing a responsible safari holiday can help conserve wildlife and contribute to local economies.

Responsible safari holidays

Safaris are some of the world’s most exclusive holidays. Travelling to some of the least explored wildernesses, staying in camps sleeping just a dozen people and enjoying the expertise of highly trained guides is an absolute privilege, as is seeing some of the continent’s most threatened wildlife, in the company of its most ancient tribes

But these indulgent holiday settings sometimes belie the fact that most safaris take place in some of the poorest and least developed nations on earth; in regions where electricity and running water remain a privilege, not a right, and where, until recently, conflict or drought may have ravaged the landscape and its people. There is, of course, great potential for this wealth to cut through the poverty, to empower native communities who have long been without a voice, and to tackle conservation issues such as the extraction of natural resources and that ever-present vice: poaching. But doing so requires the participation of governments and tour operators, local communities and travellers, to ensure that safaris are not something we will one day look upon as a quaint holiday of the past – while the animals still.

FAHARI SAFARI is committed to making a positive impact and positive social and environmental legacy where we operate. Tanzania is our home and we’re dedicated to improving it; for the environment, for local people and for our employees, by developing protocols and practices which are outlined by the UNCTAD’s sustainable development goals.
We received the UNCTAD award (presented by Responsible Tourism Tanzania) for “most responsible tour operator in Tanzania” for the last year (2022), and we are totally commitment to promoting responsible travel at the highest level.

We focus on the following sustainable tourism objectives and protocols, by:

  • Limiting our environmental impact and maximizing our positive impact on our communities by:
    • Reducing our carbon impact, In late 2018 we were awarded by Carbon Tanzania as ‘elite offsetters’; not only due to our commitment to offsetting our carbon inputs, but also to reduce our environmental impacts. One good example of this is our 2022 initiative to eliminate single use plastics from our waste stream, but also to recycle all our company’s plastic waste with a local partner in Arusha called Dunia Designs.
    • Following Travelife sustainability standards, We were awarded a merit-based partnership status with Travelife in November 2022. These broad-based sustainability standards are the nuts and bolts of responsible business.
    • Using local resources sustainably and practising Leave No Trace (LNT) environmental ethics, to minimize our environmental impacts
    • Reducing the burden of plastic pollution by collecting and recycling all plastic consumed by our business, and employing a zero plastic water-bottle policy.
    • Reducing our carbon impact, In late 2018 we were awarded by Carbon Tanzania as ‘elite offsetters’; not only due to our commitment to offsetting our carbon inputs, but also to reduce our environmental impacts. One good example of this is our 2022 initiative to eliminate single use plastics from our waste stream, but also to recycle all our company’s plastic waste with a local partner in Arusha called Dunia Designs.
    • Following Travelife sustainability standards, We were awarded a merit-based partnership status with Travelife in November 2022. These broad-based sustainability standards are the nuts and bolts of responsible business.
    • Using local resources sustainably and practising Leave No Trace (LNT) environmental ethics, to minimize our environmental impacts
    • Reducing the burden of plastic pollution by collecting and recycling all plastic consumed by our business, and employing a zero plastic water-bottle policy.
  • Developing ethical porter treatments standards on Mount Kilimanjaro, in our leading role and longtime partnership with KPAP, so that porters enjoy fair and transparent working conditions, treatment and pay. In the process, we influence others to follow.
  • Practicing cultural tourism with integrity – with our unique trekking programs which share traditional Maasai culture in an authentic and respectful way, and give benefits to these communities we visit.
  • Leadership – We take training, education and skills training seriously, and we are committed to developing leaders. Our mountain guides and top management are all trained and certified as Wilderness First Responders, Leave No Trace mentors, and stand-out members of our communities. We are dedicated to develop responsible leaders and professionals.
  • People

Every year we donate female hygiene pads for the schools girls in remote schools areas. This has been a big problem which cause school girls to miss their studies for a week in every month hence effect a lot of girl’s academic performance in general. This is because many families do not afford to buy the pads for their girls.
Most lodges and hotels we take our clients buy food, fruits, and vegetable from the local markets owned by small business entrepreneurs which help to raise individual economy and community in general.

With regard to your own social behavior, it is important to be aware of the local community’s culture and traditions and to respect local etiquette. We would hope that all our clients intend a cultural exchange during their visit to learn more about the host community. We suggest that:

You ask before you want to take a picture of an individual except when you’re in the game drive
Greetings with hand shake is much appreciated
People are very shy some time they can avoid eyes contact is normal for the local here.

Responsible tourism tips

Remember that wherever you go on safari, you are likely to be travelling in one of the world’s poorest nations. Do your bit by tipping your guides, drivers, cooks and hotel staff – discuss an appropriate amount with your tour operator before you depart, and come prepared with cash.

Never purchase items made from endangered species, including coral, turtle shells or eggs, ivory, fur or bone. Much of Africa is quite conservative, especially in rural areas and along the predominantly Muslim coast and islands of East Africa. Skimpy clothing is inappropriate outside of the beach resorts, and women especially should cover their legs and upper arms. One good tip is to buy a kanga – a kind of local sarong, which can be used as a quick cover up (even wrapped over trousers for extra modesty) as well as a towel, blanket or scarf at other times.

Learn the three way African handshake – sure to be an icebreaker with the unsuspecting locals!

If you are one of the many bird watchers flocking (sorry) to Africa, become a member of the African Bird Club, which funds conservation projects and works very much hand in hand with local people.

Water is extremely scarce in many of Africa’s safari destinations. Take short showers rather than baths and reuse towels. Some lodges provide buckets in the shower to catch water while it is heating and while you are showering. This is then used by staff for cleaning or you can also use it to do laundry.

Limited water is also easily contaminated. Some lodges provide biodegradable toiletries and laundry detergents, but if bringing your own or camping, please use environmentally-friendly products.

It’s natural to want to get closer to the animals – but this will distress them. Never ask your guide to leave the trails or drive after wildlife, and be sure to obey all rules in the reserves. Fires start fast and burn hard here; never drop cigarette butts or matches on the ground, be extremely careful when building fires, and keep water to hand to extinguish sparks and embers.

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